EOS in Novi Launches 3-D Printing Platform to Share Data for COVID-19 Supplies

Novi’s EOS, a technology supplier for industrial metal and polymer 3-D printing, Wednesday launched an online platform and LinkedIn group designed to support the battle against COVID-19.
404
man wearing 3-D printed ventilator mask
EOS started an online platform for 3-D printing companies to access printing data for medical supplies such as ventilator masks. // Photo courtesy of EOS

Novi’s EOS, a technology supplier for industrial metal and polymer 3-D printing, Wednesday launched an online platform and LinkedIn group designed to support the battle against COVID-19.

The open platform is expected to feature relevant data, projects, and files free to download and ready to print. The site will be updated on a regular basis and offers 3-D printer files for needed medical and safety devices including masks for hospital ventilators, hands-free 3-D printed door openers, and face shields. The website is available here. Click here for a related LinkedIn page.

“Improving people’s lives with the help of 3-D printing has always been our aspiration,” says Marie Langer, CEO of EOS. “The current pandemic now calls for a joint approach, more than ever before. Today, we are asking all supporters to join us in tackling the challenges that lay ahead of us. Let’s do what our technology is enabling us for: Let’s think differently and push the boundaries of what is possible. We are extremely proud to work alongside so many brilliant minds inside and outside of EOS who are developing and delivering critical solutions for those in need.”

Users are asked to share best practices and examples of their work.

EOS has been supporting the medical industry for many years with certified systems, certified materials, qualified processes, and consulting. In order to ensure that everything EOS shares on the platform is safe and meets medical standards, the company’s global team of experts screens each contribution.

Demand for medical devices and protective equipment is increasing as the pandemic continues, and additive manufacturing reduces dependence on traditional supply chains, allowing shortages to be more rapidly addressed.

Also, data can be shared around the world, allowing the same products to be 3-D printed in different countries, allowing supplies to be made based on local need regardless of the state of supply chains.

“We want to provide sustainable support,” says Langer. “Current activities range from filling critical needs to helping repurpose existing equipment or providing rapid tooling for traditional manufacturing and, with a future perspective, digitize critical items to avoid future problems or shortages.”

Facebook Comments