Oakland County Partners with Motorola Solutions to Update Public Safety Radio System

Oakland County has entered into a contract with Motorola Solutions to replace its public safety radio system with the ASTRO 25 land-mobile radio network that will interface with the statewide Michigan Public Safety Communication System. Oakland County will be the first in Michigan to use the solution’s phase two technology, which will more than double the number of users on one system. The project will cost $46.9 million.
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Motorola Solutions portable two-way radio
Oakland County and Motorola Solutions have signed a contract to upgrade the county’s public safety radio system. // Photo courtesy of Motorola Solutions

Oakland County has entered into a contract with Motorola Solutions to replace its public safety radio system with the ASTRO 25 land-mobile radio network that will interface with the statewide Michigan Public Safety Communication System. Oakland County will be the first in Michigan to use the solution’s phase two technology, which will more than double the number of users on one system. The project will cost $46.9 million.

“Oakland County always pursues innovation to provide outstanding services to our residents and businesses,” says Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson. “That’s why we collaborated with our cities, villages, and townships to identify and implement leading-edge communications technology that will improve public safety for years to come.”

The county’s goal is to improve the ability of first responders to communicate with each other during emergencies as well as with neighboring counties and state and federal agencies.

“Oakland County has long been a role model for agencies working together to improve public safety,” says Chris Lonnett, regional vice president for Motorola Solutions. “This will be a great step forward to improve regional communications interoperability.”

The network will also provide Oakland County’s public safety departments countywide paging of fire fighters with new 700/800 MHz pagers.

“This new partnership with Motorola Solutions will launch Oakland County into a whole new level of emergency communications,” says Oakland County Sheriff Michael J. Bouchard. “Technology is constantly changing, and this investment will give our first responders the tools they need to serve our residents. Once again, Oakland County will set a standard for other counties to follow and emulate.”

The contract requires 1 percent grade of service, which means 99 out of 100 times, the two-way radio will be fully available to a first responder. The contract also requires the new radio system to cover 97 percent of the county outdoors and 95 percent of the county while in buildings. A 31-simulcast system will help ensure Motorola Solutions provides reliable and dependable communications that will provide full-system capacity to every first responder in Oakland County.

The project will replace more than 3,500 portable radios and about 2,000 radios in emergency vehicles. They will be equipped with Wi-Fi and support wireless programming. It will also replace 76 radio consoles at the 20 Oakland County 911 public safety answering points or dispatch centers with the Motorola Solutions MCC 7500E dispatch consoles, which will be tightly integrated with the existing Motorola Solutions Callworks platform to maximize the capabilities for emergency call taking.

The system will be built with multiple layers of redundancy to withstand large-scale emergencies such as tornadoes or floods. The design includes 31 sites, 12 channels on the 700/800 MHz, and will be built to Project 25 phase one and phase two standards.

Oakland County’s Courts and Law Enforcement Management Information System, which uses computer technology for criminal justice and public safety applications, will use APX Radio Management to maintain and update the fleet of radios through a central database.

Implementing the full system will take up to three years. Over the next six months, Oakland County and Motorola Solutions will design it to submit it to the Michigan Public Safety Communication System for review.

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