New Platform by Cybersecurity Firm CloudFace Blocks Hackers

CloudFace in Northville, an Industry 4.0 supporter that works in the automotive, health care, supply chain, and cybersecurity sectors, today announced it has developed an encryption system that blocks hackers from infiltrating digital systems.
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CloudFace graphic
CloudFace’s new encryption system blocks hackers from infiltrating digital systems in internet of things products. // Image courtesy of CloudFace

CloudFace in Northville, an Industry 4.0 supporter that works in the automotive, health care, supply chain, and cybersecurity sectors, today announced it has developed an encryption system that blocks hackers from infiltrating digital systems.

“Our individualized approach involves ‘white labelling’ a solution for each individual client based on specific client requirements,” says Phil Abraham, founder and CEO of CloudFace. “We have extended capabilities to add further artificial intelligence (AI) to our solution and we ‘camouflage’ the entire transaction. We make your business needs, your business needs only.

“In addition, using our system, a vehicle can’t be hacked, vital health care data remains safe, and hackers can’t penetrate digital platforms. It’s the ultimate lockbox for your data. It’s quantum proof, and we branded it CloudFace Digital Fortress.”

Abraham, a pioneer in cybersecurity, developed the world’s first digital supply chain platform, called Manugistics. He also worked with General Motors Co. to migrate its data to the cloud, which led to the creation of Covisint in 2000 (acquired by OpenText in 2017 for $103 million).

Today most businesses utilize existing networks to exchange data. Each user has a certain level of security needs ranging from highly classified to the sharing of personal information. Most computer transactions upon being hacked or compromised, suffer some type of economic or personal loss.

To eliminate hacking, CloudFace developed a Quantum-Resistant data security system where, in simple terms, each individual segment of a data stream gets more than 1 million keys. The company’s data security solution (polymorphic random number generator) establishes a unique key for each of the millions of pieces of data.

From there, using CloudFace’s unique encryption method, data points are randomly grouped into different lengths, and segments are independent from each other, and then reassembled at the point of delivery.

The solution is patented. There have been attempts to generate unique keys by several companies and federal agencies, but Abraham says no one has been able to break CloudFace’s code, or hack a given system equipped with its technology.

In addition, the CloudFace solution eliminates the need for PKIs. PKI (or Public Key Infrastructure) is the framework of encryption and cybersecurity that protects communications between a server (website) and clients (users). PKIs work by using two different cryptographic keys: a public key and a private key.

For further information, email phil.abraham@cloudfaceUSA.com or jim.carlson@cloudfaceusa.com.

Abraham and CloudFace were featured in DBusiness magazine in 2016, to read the feature click here.

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