Governor’s Budget Includes Some, But Not Enough Reform To Meet Michigan’s Fiscal Changes

Detroit Renaissance, a private, non-profit leadership organization dedicated to accelerating the region’s economic growth, issued the following statement today regarding Governor Granholm’s proposed 2010 budget.
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DETROIT, February 12, 2009 – Detroit Renaissance, a private, non-profit leadership organization dedicated to accelerating the region’s economic growth, issued the following statement today regarding Governor Granholm’s proposed 2010 budget.

“We applaud Governor Granholm’s recommendations that address several of the budget reform principles we have previously called for, such as proposing virtually no new programs, significant Corrections budget reductions, and some Medicaid cuts. But this budget still relies too heavily on one-time budget cuts versus structural reforms,” said Doug Rothwell, president, Detroit Renaissance. “The recommendations do not go far enough in reducing future spending pressures, which limits the ability to adopt tax reforms that would make Michigan more competitive. We also are concerned that the proposed budget doesn’t totally close the projected deficit and will rely too much on federal stimulus dollars.”

“We had hoped the Administration would have adopted more of the $1.5 billion in potential budget reforms that have been identified by various groups, like the Center for Michigan.  These reforms should take precedence over cutting higher education which may hinder Michigan’s ability to attract and retain talent,” added Rothwell.

About Detroit Renaissance:
Detroit Renaissance provides leadership to accelerate the economic transformation of Detroit and Southeast Michigan. Renaissance accomplishes this work by serving as a catalyst to develop growth strategies, advocating for those strategies and championing specific initiatives that accelerate growth. A 501(c)(3) organization that was formed in 1970, Detroit Renaissance includes the chief executive officers of the region’s most significant employers and universities. For more information, visit www.detroitrenaissance.com.

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