Birmingham Photographer's Botanical Work to be on Display

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Laurie Tennent, a Birmingham-based fine art photographer, will have her botanical work on display in Birmingham, Detroit and Chicago this spring.

Tennent, who has exhibited nationally and internationally, received her BFA in Photography from the College of Creative Studies in Detroit. She is president of the Birmingham Bloomfield Cultural Council and 2013 Cultural Arts Award Recipient for her philanthropic work.

In Birmingham, the Robert Kidd Gallery, located at 107 Townsend St., will host a solo exhibition of Tennent’s botanical photographs April 9 through May 6. Pushing the boundaries between photography and painting, revealing in striking detail the architecture of plant life, her large-scale photographs — up to seven-feet wide or tall — expose nature’s innate beauty and delicate sensuality. The opening reception for the artist will be held at the Robert Kidd Gallery from 5-8 p.m. April 9.

“Complexity of character, masculine and feminine, intimate yet bold, sensual yet strong,” Tennent says. “My photographs are an exploration of these dualities. By exaggerating the inner architecture of plant life, I offer the viewer a chance to become confronted by, and immersed in, nature.”

More than 20 works by Tennent will also be featured at The Chicago Botanic Garden, a 385-acre living plant museum in Glencoe, from April 18-Sept. 25. Curated by Exhibitions and Programs Production Manager Gabriel Hutchinson, this is the first stop of a national tour of Tennent’s work, Botanicals: An Intimate Portrait. To prepare for the show, the Detroit-based artist went to Chicago to work with botanists to add unusual specimens to her portfolio. The work will be on display all summer  in the Krehbiel Gallery, located in the Regenstein Center at the Garden.

“Her work is spectacular,” says Hutchison. “It’s a different kind of printing process than what you normally see. Her work is very distinctive, and it’s incredible to see the flowers on such a grand scale.”

 

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