Southfield’s Lawrence Tech Receives DENSO Grant to Research Vehicle Machine Vision Safety System

Lawrence Technological University in Southfield has received a $40,000 grant from mobility supplier DENSO to conduct research on a machine vision system to improve vehicle safety.
443
Lawrence Technological University
Lawrence Technological University will use a $40,000 grant from DENSO to research a machine vision system for vehicle safety. // File photo

Lawrence Technological University in Southfield has received a $40,000 grant from mobility supplier DENSO to conduct research on a machine vision system to improve vehicle safety.

The grant will fund the acquisition of cameras, sensors, electronic equipment, and software for the research to develop a machine vision system for vehicles to help prevent car-pedestrian and car-animal collisions, as well as other types of accidents.

Students from LTU’s architectural engineering, electrical and computer engineering, robotics engineering, and audio engineering technology programs will be involved.

“The main purpose of this grant is to have students in multiple disciplines learn about these systems, to familiarize students with these technologies while they are still undergraduates, in preparation for their future careers,” says George P. Pappas, senior lecturer in LTU’s Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering, who is the projects principal investigator.

Grants were awarded to programs based on design, materials management, mechanical and electrical engineering principles, thermodynamics, robotics, and more.

DNAF has supported STEM education through grants at colleges and universities since 2001, enabling students to access tools, technology, and experiences that better prepare them for technical careers after graduation. DENSO education grant proposals are invitation-only and evaluated based on technical merit, student experience, and alignment with industry needs.

“Investing in tomorrow’s workforce is critical to ensuring we have individuals who are equipped to help DENSO fulfill its vision of creating software and products that enhance safety and reduce environmental impact,” says Bill Foy, senior vice president of engineering at DENSO and a DNAF board member. “Through these grants, we hope to create a generation of innovators who inspire new value for the future of mobility.”

The grant was made possible by the company’s philanthropic arm, the DENSO North America Foundation (DNAF), and is one of 26 grants awarded by DENSO in 2019 to colleges and universities throughout North America. The donations are part of DENSO’s broader efforts to cultivate tomorrow’s work force and prepare young thinkers to lead a new era of innovation.

Facebook Comments