Mobility Corridor Along Michigan Avenue in Detroit Lands $25M Grant

The U.S. Department of Transportation has awarded a $25 million Rebuilding American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity (RAISE) discretionary grant to the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) and city of Detroit for the Detroit Mobility and Innovation Corridor.
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A rendering of Michigan Avenue in Corktown following the completion of construction on the Detroit Mobility and Innovation Corridor. // Courtesy of the Michigan Department of Transportation
A rendering of Michigan Avenue in Corktown following the completion of construction on the Detroit Mobility and Innovation Corridor. // Courtesy of the Michigan Department of Transportation

The U.S. Department of Transportation has awarded a $25 million Rebuilding American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity (RAISE) discretionary grant to the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) and city of Detroit for the Detroit Mobility and Innovation Corridor.

The project includes the construction of a shared use corridor along approximately two miles of US-12 (Michigan Avenue) that will include non-motorized facilities, installation of new dedicated transit, and connected and autonomous vehicle lanes.

The two-mile stretch extends from M-1 (Woodward Avenue) in downtown’s Campus Martius Park to the I-96 overpass on the western edge of the Corktown neighborhood. Construction is expected to begin in 2024.

The section of Michigan Avenue spans multiple commercial businesses, the upcoming Godfrey Hotel, Michigan Central (Ford’s mobility innovation district), and The Corner, an apartment and retail project that overlooks The Corner Ballpark by Detroit PAL (former Tiger Stadium at Michigan and Trumbull Street).

The work includes the removal, restoration, and reinstallation of the historic red bricks into other aspects of the roadway’s design in this portion of Michigan Avenue while new red concrete pavers will be placed in the historically designated limits to maintain the corridor’s unique feel.

Including engineering, construction, and contingency costs, the estimated total cost for the DMIC is $50 million with $42.7 million going toward the State portion of Michigan Avenue, and $7.32 million going toward the city’s portion within the project limits. MDOT is committed to contributing $22.7 million toward the overall project costs, or 45 percent of the total.

“The Detroit Mobility and Innovation Corridor will provide a more safe, accessible, and environmentally sustainable corridor for travel,” says Paul C. Ajegba, state transportation director. “Improving pedestrian space and crossings, raising protected bike lanes to sidewalk level, and providing dedicated transit and connected vehicle lanes will simultaneously enhance comfort and safety for non-motorized users while providing an infrastructure platform for the next generation of electric and connected mobility.”

Public meetings were conducted in 2020-21 to consider the environmental, historical, cultural, and feasibility issues early in the transportation planning process. By creating a safer multi-modal corridor, the project will support efficient and accessible public transit while encouraging low or no-carbon transportation modes.

The changes also will also better connect residents who do not or cannot drive to economic opportunities and public services along the corridor

“This $25 million RAISE grant not only helps to create jobs and boost our state’s economy, it further positions Michigan as a leader in connected and autonomous vehicles and multimodal transportation design,” says Zach Kolodin, Michigan’s chief infrastructure officer and director of the Michigan Infrastructure Office.

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