McLaren Macomb First in Midwest to Treat and Repair Brain Aneurysms with New Technology

Interventional neurologists at McLaren Macomb in Mt. Clemens were the first in the Midwest to use the new Pipeline Flex Embolization Device with Shield Technology to treat and repair brain aneurysms.
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Dr. Majjhoo and Dr. Rayes implant the Pipeline Flex Embolization Device with Shield Technology on June 1. // Courtesy of McLaren Macomb
Dr. Majjhoo and Dr. Rayes implant the Pipeline Flex Embolization Device with Shield Technology on June 1. // Courtesy of McLaren Macomb

Interventional neurologists at McLaren Macomb in Mt. Clemens were the first in the Midwest to use the new Pipeline Flex Embolization Device with Shield Technology to treat and repair brain aneurysms.

The minimally invasive device received FDA approval on April 21 this year. It is a catheter-based neurological procedure in which a mesh-like stent in implanted within the cerebral artery across the bridge of the aneurysm, diverting the blood flow that aids growth and potential rupture. The diversion of blood flow allows the aneurysm to shrink naturally over time.

The device’s Shield Technology advancement is a first-of-its-kind progression, modifying the Pipeline to reduce its material thrombogenicity, which is a device’s tendency to create potential stroke-causing blood clots.

“The original introduction of the Pipeline was a significant advancement in how aneurysms are repaired and treated overall,” says Dr. Aniel Majjhoo, interventional neurologist and medical director of neurosciences at McLaren Health Care. “This advancement adds to the level of safety for the patient, both during their procedure and in their recovery.”

Dr. Majjhoo and fellow interventional neurologist Dr. Mahmoud Rayes performed the procedure in the hospital’s advanced imaging procedure room. Dr. Majjhoo performed the same procedure in the same room with the original Pipeline Flex Embolization device was introduced in 2017.

“The procedure was performed and completed without any clinical complications,” Dr. Rayes says. “It was a total success, and the patient is expected to have a great outcome.”

Un-ruptured aneurysms may not present with any symptoms while others will have symptoms of worsening headaches, numbness on one side of the face, double vision, and drooping eyelids.

Ruptured aneurysms, resulting in a life-threatening subarachnoid hemorrhage, require emergency medical care. Symptoms can include a sudden-onset severe headache described as the “worst headache ever,” nausea and vomiting, stiff neck, blurred and double vision, seizure, sensitivity to light, droopy eyelids, confusion, and loss of consciousness.

Learn more about neurological care at McLaren Macomb here.

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