Invictus Innovation Outlines Long-term Plans for Chip Production in Pontiac

Invictus Innovation EV Technology outlined its long-term plans for advanced technology training and semi-conductor chip manufacturing today at its facility in Pontiac.
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Invictus Innovation EV Technology announced plans to produce semi-conductor chips in Pontiac in the near future. // Courtesy of Invictus Innovation EV Technology
Invictus Innovation EV Technology announced plans to produce semi-conductor chips in Pontiac in the near future. // Courtesy of Invictus Innovation EV Technology

Invictus Innovation EV Technology outlined its long-term plans for advanced technology training and semi-conductor chip manufacturing today at its facility in Pontiac.

The enterprise is focused on creating an entry way into advanced technology jobs for African Americans. Partnerships with HBCUs are expected to assist in this goal.

Danny Wilkerson, managing partner of the company, told a group of Democratic politicians and business professionals gathered for the occasion that he expects training and chip production to begin in 11 months.

“We have a great team,” Wilkerson says. “We’re going to create a wealth of talent and keep it here in Michigan with facilities and jobs.”

The current facility covers about 50,000 square feet and is located on South Boulevard in Pontiac. Mahindra also is in the building.

Long-range plans call for a futuristic campus to be built, “hopefully in Pontiac,” according to Wilkerson. Renderings show a central, circular building that will house administrative offices and R&D surrounded by what Wilkerson calls training and manufacturing pods.

There is no site yet selected for this project, costs are unknown, and no financing was announced.

“We’re going to do some big work here,” says Wilkerson, referring to the demand for chips. “We could build manufacturing facilities in eight states and there still wouldn’t be enough.”

Invictus Innovation currently is partnering with the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor and expects to forge future cooperation with federal, state, and local governments.

The global auto industry has struggled to deliver new vehicles due to a shortage of computer chips caused by supply chain delays and the fact semiconductor manufacturers are giving priority to makers of video games, smartphones, and consumer electronics. The latter markets provide more profitability to semiconductor manufacturers, leaving automakers scrambling to build new supply operations.

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