HFHS’s Brigitte Harris Cancer Pavilion in Detroit Opens Next Week, Features DIA Artwork

The new Brigitte Harris Cancer Pavilion, part of the Henry Ford Cancer Institute at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, will feature reproductions of artistic masterpieces from the Detroit Institute of Arts’ collection.
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Portrait of a Collagist reproduction at HFHS
The DIA has brought its Inside | Out program to the new Brigitte Harris Cancer Pavilion at the Henry Ford Cancer Institute, installing reproductions of the museum’s paintings. Pictured is a reproduction of “Portrait of a Collagist” by Benny Andrews. // Photo courtesy of Henry Ford Health System

The new Brigitte Harris Cancer Pavilion, part of the Henry Ford Cancer Institute at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, will feature reproductions of artistic masterpieces from the Detroit Institute of Arts’ collection.

As part of the DIA’s Inside | Out program, 28 reproductions will be on display throughout the first, second, and third floors of the new 187,000-square-foot facility. The pavilion, which is scheduled to begin providing patient care on Jan. 20, will offer disease-specific clinics, precision medicine, clinical trials, and supportive services.

“We are incredibly grateful for the support of the DIA in helping us create a unique healing environment for our patients and their families,” said Mary Jane Vogt, executive vice president and chief development officer at Henry Ford Health System. “Those who are experiencing the cancer journey often face challenges that are exhausting not only physically, but also mentally and emotionally. The beautiful artwork provided by the DIA will offer a soothing and positive distraction that patients and families can enjoy.”

The pieces on display will include reproductions of famous paintings by Solomon Irein Wangboje, Vincent Van Gogh, Karin Kneffel, and others. The pavilion is located less than three miles from the DIA.

“Art holds incredible power — it can provoke, inspire, connect, and teach. But most importantly, it can heal,” says Salvador Salort-Pons, director of the DIA. “Through these examples of human creativity, patients and their families can find hope and beauty. And it is particularly meaningful to me personally to partner with the Brigitte Harris Cancer Pavilion, named for the late wife of my dear friend, Mort Harris.”

The reproductions and their placement were selected taking into account the physical and emotional journeys patients and their families experience. Works near the elevator aim to give people something to consider while they wait and soothe anxiety before or after appointments.

Works in the waiting areas will feature serene and hopeful imagery, and works displayed along the Nancy Vlasic Skywalk that connects the cancer pavilion to Henry Ford Hospital are colorful and dynamic to capture attention as visitors explore the pavilion or are in transit.

“Cancer treatment usually requires patients to spend a lot of time inside,” says Megan Winkel, Lindsay Anderson Healing Arts Curator and manager of the Healing Arts Program at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. “Some of our patients travel from other states and even other countries, but because of the time needed for treatment and their physical condition, they might not have an opportunity to get out and experience the rich arts and cultural offerings of Detroit. Through this partnership, our patients with cancer and their families can enjoy artworks featured in the DIA’s world-class collection, right from where they are being treated.”

Henry Ford Health System is based in Detroit and has six hospitals and more than 250 outpatient facilities. It employs more than 33,000 people, including more than 1,600 physicians, more than 6,600 nurses, and 5,000 allied health professionals.

The Detroit Institute of Arts is home to more than 60,000 works from ancient times through the 21st century.

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