GM to Increase Vehicle Shipments to North America Over Summer

General Motors Co. in Detroit announced plans today to increase deliveries to dealers and customers in the United States and Canada to meet growing demand for Chevrolet, Buick, GMC, and Cadillac vehicles.
9
Grills of GMC SUVs in a row
General Motors will increase shipments of vehicles to match high demand. // Stock Photo

General Motors Co. in Detroit announced plans today to increase deliveries to dealers and customers in the United States and Canada to meet growing demand for Chevrolet, Buick, GMC, and Cadillac vehicles.

The Chevy Silverado HD and GMC Sierra HD full-size pickups will increase production by around 1,000 trucks per month beginning in July due to production line efficiency increases delivered by the Flint Assembly team.

Chevy Colorado’s and GMC Canyon’s, produced at Wentzville Assembly in Missouri, will increase by around 30,000 total units between mid-May and the week of July 5. The units have been held at the plant due to the ongoing semiconductor supply shortage. Other smaller quantities of vehicles held for this reason will be shipped during June and July as well.

The final part of the plan is for U.S. assembly plants producing the most capacity-constrained products to forego dedicated vacation downtime over the summer. It also announced that full-size pickup production will return to Oshawa Assembly in Ontario, Canada, which ceased production in 2019.

“The global semiconductor shortage remains complex and very fluid, but the speed, agility and commitment of our team, including our dealers, has helped us find creative ways to satisfy customers,” says Phil Kienle, vice president of North American manufacturing and labor relations. “Customer demand continues to be very strong, and GM’s engineering, supply chain and manufacturing teams have done a remarkable job maximizing production of high-demand and capacity-constrained vehicles.”

Due to GMs success in maximizing the semiconductors they do have to ship these vehicles and pushing shipments into the second quarter, it is projected to deliver better first-half financial results than initially expected.

Certain facilities in North America, Asia, and South America, however, will remain impacted by the semiconductor shortage at least until the end of July. While global supplies recover, the company plans to implement similar strategies in markets around the world.

Facebook Comments