GM in Detroit Reduces Manufacturing Carbon Intensity 3 Years Ahead of Goal, According to Sustainability Report

Detroit’s General Motors Co. has released its ninth annual sustainability report to update employees, investors, policymakers, advocacy groups, and customers on the moves it made in 2018 toward its vision of a world with zero crashes, zero emissions, and zero congestion. The report was called Transformation in Progress.
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Electric vehicle charging
GM has released its ninth annual sustainability report. The company plans to use only renewable energy for its electricity by 2030. // Photo courtesy of General Motors Co.

Detroit’s General Motors Co. has released its ninth annual sustainability report to update employees, investors, policymakers, advocacy groups, and customers on the moves it made in 2018 toward its vision of a world with zero crashes, zero emissions, and zero congestion. The report was called Transformation in Progress.

“For years, we have said that the auto industry is experiencing more change today than in the past 50 years. That pace of change is only accelerating,” says Mary Barra, chairman and CEO of GM. “With the right team, technology, resources, and scale to achieve our vision, I believe the only thing that can stop us is not acting quickly enough. Disruption creates uncertainty, but it also creates vast possibilities that will lead to a better world.”

The report also covers GM’s goal to build an inclusive, customer-focused culture with strong corporate governance and transparency.

According to the report, GM has reduced its manufacturing carbon intensity since 2010, three years ahead of its goal. It set a new goal to reduce emissions by 31 percent by 2030 compared to a 2010 baseline, consistent with the level of decarbonization required by science-based methodology.

Renewable energy powers 20 percent of GM’s electricity needs and is expected to power 100 percent by 2050. GM is also the first automotive company to commit to future sourcing of sustainable natural rubber for tires to mitigate deforestation and its effects on climate change.

Cars being tested by Cruise, GM’s self-driving, ride-hailing subsidiary, drove 3.5 times more miles in 2018 than in 2017. The company secured commitments for more than $5 billion of external investment.

Cadillac will be GM’s lead brand for electrification technologies, and the company will double its engineering resources focused on electric vehicle and autonomous vehicle programs in the next two years.

Chevrolet debuted an industry-first feature in the 2020 Traverse that reminds drivers to buckle up.

GM supported initiatives promoting STEM education, vehicle and road safety, and community development through grant funding in 28 states that served 1.4 million individuals.

The company ranks 14th and industry highest on the JUST 100, a ranking of companies whose business behaviors align with priorities of the American public in environment, social, and ethical factors. It ranks first worldwide on Equileaps’s 2018 Gender Equality in the Workplace and is the fourth most transparent S&P 500 company for ESG disclosure as evaluated by HIP Investor.

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