Ford, Bosch to Use Virtual Reality to Train Technicians on All-electric Mustang Mach-E

Ford Motor Co. in Dearborn and Bosch in Farmington Hills have created a new virtual reality tool to train technicians on how to service and maintain the all-electric Mustang Mach-E without the need to access the actual vehicle.
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Ford Motor Co. and Bosch have created a new virtual reality tool to train technicians how to service and maintain the all-electric Mustang Mach-E. // Photo courtesy of Ford Motor Co.

Ford Motor Co. in Dearborn and Bosch in Farmington Hills have created a new virtual reality tool to train technicians on how to service and maintain the all-electric Mustang Mach-E without the need to access the actual vehicle.

When it arrives in late 2020, the automaker says the Mustang Mach-E will be available with standard and extended-range battery options with either rear-wheel drive or all-wheel drive powered by permanent magnet motors.

Equipped with an extended-range battery and rear-wheel drive, Mach-E has a targeted EPA-estimated range of at least 300 miles, about the distance a gasoline-powered vehicle can go on a single fill up. In extended-range all-wheel-drive configurations, Mach-E is targeting 332 horsepower and 417 lb.-ft. of torque – with the standard all-wheel-drive variation targeting quicker times to 60 mph than the base Porsche Macan series.

Ford also will offer two special performance versions. The GT is targeting 0-60 mph in less than 4 seconds, making it faster off the line than a Porsche Macan Turbo. The GT Performance Edition, meanwhile, is targeting a comparable 0-60 mph in the mid-3-second range to a Porsche 911 GTS. Both GT configurations are targeting an estimated 342 kW (459 horsepower) and 830 Nm (612 lb.-ft.) of torque.

Potential Mach-E GT buyers can make reservations now for deliveries starting in spring 2021. GT models will start at $61,600.

“Technicians will be immersed in a simulated and gamified world, meaning they won’t need to rely on actual Mustang Mach-E vehicles to learn about its components, including the electric SUV’s new high-voltage system,” says Dave Johnson, director of Ford service engineering operations. “This new virtual reality training tool allows technicians to understand the components and steps required to service these high-voltage systems, then confidently perform diagnostics and maintenance.”

A technician will learn how to diagnose and perform service related to the vehicle’s high-voltage system wearing the virtual reality headset. This includes tasks such as removal and installation of the main battery as well as service and maintenance on the battery pack itself.

Bosch also is developing future extensions where the technicians utilize VR to enter the vehicle and navigate through modules as if they were walking through rooms to learn the system. Navigating between modules enables the technicians to determine the issue to repair the vehicle.

“The virtual reality training solution is about new technology that builds efficiency,” says Geoff Mee, director of operations for Bosch. “By improving the diagnostic process, technicians are able to perform maintenance and make repairs faster and more easily.”

This new virtual reality system can be used as an ongoing training tool, allowing technicians to learn niche skills in the Ford technical training program. Virtual reality training has the potential to attract new hires to the automotive repair world, rightly framing the profession as a high-tech, forward-thinking industry in which technicians can learn more efficiently in a state-of-the-art environment. Additionally, technicians can tap into the system from any location.

Bosch developed a proof of concept in 2019 for automotive service training via virtual reality, then market tested it with instructors, technicians and college students. Ford is the first automaker to pilot the application in its service technician powertrain repair course, specifically with the all-new Mustang Mach-E, the company’s first all-electric SUV. Ford could expand the technology to train on additional vehicles in the future.

The virtual reality training solution uses an Oculus Quest virtual reality headset from Facebook. Ford and Bosch are working with Oculus for Business to manage their fleet of headsets deployed to the Ford technician training program, as well as with PIXO VR. The company’s proprietary virtual reality content distribution platform enables scaling and iterating virtual reality training software and applications.

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