Detroit’s Three Squared Offers Plan to Turn Shipping Containers into Patient, Health Personnel Residential Units

Three Squared, a Detroit-based architecture firm, says it can design its cargo container dwellings as relief units for hospital and morgue/mortuary overflow as well as climate-controlled housing for medical personnel who need to stay close to hospitals.
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Three Squared COVID-19 care cargo container
Three Squared’s design of a cargo container turned COVID-19 patient care rooms. // Rendering courtesy of Three Squared

Three Squared, a Detroit-based architecture firm, says it can design its cargo container dwellings as relief units for hospital and morgue/mortuary overflow as well as climate-controlled housing for medical personnel who need to stay close to hospitals.

“Amid the crisis, we’ve been refocusing our residential lodging efforts to instead resolve the current hospital housing crisis,” says Leslie Horn, CEO of Three Squared. “In consultation with several doctors who’ve shared front-line problems and needs in relation, and through concerted efforts to rally and align with other builders in the shipping container sector, we’ve identified two distinct gaps in hospital housing and successfully devised two specialized solutions to wholly resolve these needs.”

The company specializes in multifamily and mixed-use housing using steel cargo containers. The company’s first solution would provide relief for those hospitals facing a bed shortage. Mobile cargo units could be delivered by a truck, hooked up to temporary plumbing and power, set on temporary foundations, and covered with temporary tent structures. Each unit contains two hospital beds on opposite beds and a central bathroom with running water. The bathroom also has an exterior door, allowing hospital workers to decontaminate it at any time.

The company’s second proposed solution involves shipping container units for use as hospital staff temporary housing. They would be located near the patient hospital bed cargo units.

“After the pandemic has run its course and the hospital patient and staff-use shipping container structures have achieved their objectives, the cargo units will be picked back up and delivered to a final ‘afterlife’ resting place as housing for homeless, veterans, disaster relief, college dormitories, food growing operations, and more,” says Horn. “They can also be easily stacked and stand at-the-ready to assist in future disaster relief efforts.”

Horn estimates the company could modify and deliver two shipping container units per week with the ability to ramp up production.

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