Corewell Health Joins Study to Assess 3-D Printed Models for Orthopedic Tumor Removal

Corewell Health William Beaumont University Hospital in Royal Oak is one of the first two medical facilities in the world to evaluate the use of 3-D printed models for orthopedic oncology.
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Corewell Health William Beaumont University Hospital in Royal Oak is one of the first two medical facilities in the world to evaluate the use of 3-D printed models for orthopedic oncology. // Stock photo

Corewell Health William Beaumont University Hospital in Royal Oak is one of the first two medical facilities in the world to evaluate the use of 3-D printed models for orthopedic oncology.

The study, which also is taking place at Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center,

will assess the efficacy of patient-specific 3-D printed anatomical models for preoperative planning and tumor excision in comparison to the current standard of care, which relies solely on CT or MRI imaging.

“Being one of the sites to participate in this study puts us on the forefront of demonstrating new technologies that can advance patient care and improve health outcomes,” says Dr. Aws Hammad, on the clinical faculty of orthopaedic surgery at Corewell Health William Beaumont University Hospital.

“Addressing the challenges that come along with bone sarcomas and utilizing the power of patient-specific 3-D modeling is a significant step in not only patient education but as an aid to surgeons for more precise surgical procedures.”

The joint research aims to demonstrate potential improvements in surgical outcomes, including reduced blood loss, shorter operating time including time under anesthesia, and decreased risk of procedural complications.

To do this, clinical outcomes will be compared between an experimental group in which tumors are excised using 3-D printed models alongside imaging for planning, and an active comparator group in which tumor excision will be prepped solely with imaging.

The benefits of 3-D printed models in preoperative planning likely are severalfold and promise to positively impact both medical practitioners and patients alike. Doctors and surgeons benefit from improved and more informed presurgical planning and practicing prior to operations, making complex procedures more efficient, economical, and faster.

Unlike the limitations of computer images, this enables doctors to represent vital aspects of patient anatomy with life-size physical replicas, granting them the means to simulate procedures and aid in their precision of excision, ultimately reducing the chances of a positive margin.

In turn, the availability of accurate 3-D printed models to better communicate planned procedures, together with a greatly improved surgical process, helps to improve patient outcome and recovery.

The prospective, multi-center randomized controlled study is expected to run for 12 months and involve up to 150 subjects across three sites. The last site has yet to be announced.

“Our never-ending mission is to improve patient outcomes, and that starts with preoperative planning,” says Dr. Kyle K. VanKoevering, associate professor of otolaryngology — head and neck surgery at the Wexner Medical Center. “We look forward to participating in this study to examine how 3-D printed models may help the medical staff better prepare for surgery as well as improve patient education.”