Auburn Hills-based BorgWarner Debuts Torque Vectoring System for Electric Vehicles

Auburn Hills-based BorgWarner has developed a torque vectoring system for electric vehicles that enables the use of one electric motor instead of the two usually needed in electric vehicles. The solution is designed to be cost-effective and reduce space and weight.
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Torque-Vectoring Dual-Clutch system
BorgWarner’s Torque-Vectoring Dual-Clutch system for electric vehicles eliminates the need for two electric motors. // Image courtesy of BorgWarner

Auburn Hills-based BorgWarner has developed a torque vectoring system for electric vehicles that enables the use of one electric motor instead of the two usually needed in electric vehicles. The solution is designed to be cost-effective and reduce space and weight.

The Torque-Vectoring Dual-Clutch unit features two clutches – one inner and one outer – that replace the conventional differential in an electric driveline.

“Our new Torque-Vectoring Dual-Clutch system, which minimizes wasted torque, conserves energy, and requires fewer components, exemplifies how our existing internal combustion engine and driveline expertise complements our work with electric vehicles,” says Stefan Demmerle, president and general manager of PowerDrive systems at BorgWarner. “BorgWarner has the extensive knowledge and expertise that customers need as the industry evolves towards an electrified future.”

Designed to improve vehicle handling and maneuverability, the system commands torque independently, distributing the torque to the left and right wheels from its position on the rear axle. It is connected to one electric motor and features two reversible GenVI actuators (one per clutch), and dynamically transfers torque for improved steering response and controllability.

It has a capacity of up to 2,600 newton meters per clutch and disconnects the rear-axle when all-wheel drive isn’t needed. Having the ability to switch to front-wheel drive results in reduced losses and increased range for electric vehicles.

Production is expected to kick off in first half of 2022 for a global OEM’s electric vehicle.

BorgWarner works to create clean and efficient technology solutions for combustion, hybrid, and electric vehicles. It has locations in 19 countries and employs about 30,000 people worldwide.

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